13 ways you’ll be stereotyped for growing up in Cincinnati


You’ll be called racist.

This is America. Everywhere is racist. New York is racist. LA is racist. Seattle is racist. It’s not just the Midwest and the South. Yes, we’ve had race riots. We also have the Freedom Center. Get off your high horse.

And for the record, I hear more open, overt racism in New Jersey than I ever did growing up in Cincinnati.

You’ll be called a hick.

Okay, I’m not going to lie, when my older sister had a pick-up truck, we did put duct tape over the cracks and fill it up with water to make a hillbilly hot tub. And yes, I have had friends seriously suggest cow-tipping as a possible activity.

But if doing dumb shit when you’re a teenager makes you a hick, then everyone on the planet is a hick.

You’ll be blamed for Bush.

Yeah, sorry about that.

You’ll be blamed for Obama.

You’re welcome.

You’ll be judged for liking Cincinnati Chili.

Judge away. I’ll just sit here and eat my five-way and enjoy life while you’re busy being a judgy, bitter asshole who’s going to die alone.

Kings Island will be unfairly compared to Cedar Point.

In any other state, King’s Island would be the star attraction. Instead we get this condescending, “Oh, isn’t that just a poor man’s Cedar Point?” horse crap.

You’ll be pitied for your sports teams.

I don’t need your pity, I’m putting all of my eggs in the FC Cincinnati basket.

You’ll be judged for the Creation Museum.

Uggghh, this is what we get for taking credit for CVG, even though it’s in Kentucky. We have to take credit for this idiotic, wasteful monstrosity as well.

Someone will ask you about growing up in a corn field.

Okay, what sucks about this is that my childhood home actually bordered a cornfield. So I don’t have much to say. I mean, corn fields are spooky and awesome and really fun to play in, so I don’t really see the problem. It could’ve been worse. We could’ve grown up in a state known for cranberry bogs, tobacco fields, or potato farms.

You’ll be blamed for someone’s shitty layover at CVG.

I was once blamed for Cincinnati’s airport by a New Yorker. Who regularly flies out of the nightmare dumpster fires that are JFK and LaGuardia. To my everlasting shame, I blamed it on Kentucky, when I should’ve had the guts to stand up for CVG actually being pretty beautiful, for an airport.

People will assume you love the Cavs.

“Fuck the Cavs.”
“Oh, I just assumed since you grew up in Ohio…”
“I grew up in Cincinnati. Where we were trained to hate Cleveland.”
“Is there really a difference?”
“Get out.”

People assume you’re in the Bloods.

Wearing a Reds hat outside of Cincinnati does not indicate Reds fandom. It indicates gang membership. You’re going to want to remember this.

People think your hometown is boring AF.

Assuming they visited prior to 2010.


Reader Interactions

(59) Comments

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Crystal Murdock

I do pretty good at being alone for the most part. I know how to keep my mind busy and occupied. It’s when I get bursts of energy and want a friend to go exploring with or go get coffee , take a walk on the beach. I have been reading and studying for like almost 4 days. It’s time to get out and get some fresh air. I just wish I had a friend to do it with. I am very very selective of who I let in my life and a lot has to do with their energy and vibes I get off them.

Rebekah

September 18, 2020 at 2:26 pm

Thank you for this. I am an artist and have had a creativity block. So drawing my inner wolf helped in more ways than one!! Blessings.

Anser

Amazing article.
I am learning quite a lot already by reading some of the articles you have written, they are a great help up till now.
Hopefully, many people see a difference by doing the same. :)

sayidah

Hi Sol. Thank you very much for this share. This article is really useful to help increase the confidence of me who had experienced depression for quite a long time in previous years. I once lost my self-confidence and experienced low self-esteem and also often humiliated by people. How depressed I was at the time. Now, I am trying to build myself to be better and continue to increase my sense of confidence, especially my sense of worth.

Thank you Sol. Greetings from Indonesia.

Nikhil

I used to feel a lot lonelier
recently after a lifetime of doing things my way. LW articles helped me somewhat to get an understanding of wht my core issues were. Self care has led me to path that is more enriching and I don’t feel bad abt being lonely anymore.

Rudolf Wentzloff

If some one desires expert view on the topic of blogging after that i suggest him/her to go to see this website, Keep up the pleasant job.

Helen Raven

This website is a pure accessible source of Infinite Devine. I come here every morning and evening to read an article/ to take a glass of spiritual control and move Further, therefore feel less alienated while being completely accepted and understood. That is why, just wanted to encourage you guys, that we (readers) are already connected in some invisible web and whoever is reading this article, there are more spiritual people who can relate to you in some way. I feel that we as a powerful community should support and empower each other, so feel free to share your spiritual loneliness experiences if you feel like that. Hope you’re having a lovely day.

Yuliya

December 24, 2019 at 4:44 am

I dont know if anyone reads all of the comments, but decided to write anyway. Thank you for this article and for all the replies from readers, again and again I keep reminding myself that there are people struggling with same problems as me, and that maybe if we all connect some day in some way, we will understand that we are not the weird ones, but we are surrounded by the wrong people.
Ive been trying to get out of loneliness and depression and connect to the people around, only to find myself discussing superficial topics and drinking lots of alcohol with it. After such outings I often want to vomit, both physically and mentally.
Only for a short time in the past I felt very deep and meaningful connection with another human being, with my past lover. Ive been seeking it again ever since but never finding it with anyone or anything else.
I hope I will feel this connection again, but for now Im just lonely…

Aletheia Luna

Sakib

December 18, 2019 at 6:28 am

I have always had an overwhelming and neverending feeling of loneliness. What doesn’t help is having an enemy so great and hateful that does black magic all the time, which is one thing that stops me from having friends or much of anything else in life. Unfortunately modern society doesn’t believe in things like this, so can’t really tell anyone either.

Max

February 25, 2020 at 2:13 am

light is always greater than darkness.. find the Light of God. the closer you stay to God the darkness will learn and stay away

Michael (A.A)

November 23, 2019 at 7:16 am

I guess I’m here to talk about bisexuality. It’s not that people are outright discriminating against my own bisexuality, but I can see that people are uncomfortable with the idea when I mention it. They say they’re “Cool with that. . . “ but often always awkwardly and move away a little. I just get this idea of being well. . . somewhat abnormal. Even when people act as activists for it, they often make a big deal about it when it’s accepted, but I just want to be treated normally about it. To be accepted about it. It’s not that people are against the LGBT here, it’s more that while they emotionally accept it, they’re not aware intellectually of the myths and stereotypes around it. That’s why I often wait for some time before telling people I’m bisexual. They often assume things about my personality.

I don’t use make up. I feel no need to wear any kind of clothes to express myself about it. I look completely “straight”. I mean, not completely, but you know what I mean. I don’t have an LGBT stereotypical job as an engineer. I’m more intellectual and sarcastic than people expect. I have the stereotype of being funny, but my jokes are more intelligent and dark than often stereotyped.

People accept me, and I feel selfish for saying this when I have that, but. . . I wish I didn’t have to spend so much time being cautious about revealing it. Really. I don’t define myself with bisexuality. My life is not surrounded by the fact. Bisexuality describes me, but not my entire life.

I wish people would stop unconsciously seeing my sexuality as a circus freak, or fetishizing certain sexualities more, as men often do when enjoying lesbian porn or women watching gay porn. I mean, I’m not against that with responsible use, considering, I take part in both of those types of porn — it’s just that for people who didn’t offer consent to be supported in an LGBT relationship, people are ready to offer support just because we have the same sexuality. Come on, just because there are two gay guys, doesn’t mean they like each other. Even if you’re straight, do you fall in love with everyone opposite sex person you meet? No! And that misunderstanding is even more awkward if you’re bisexual.

daves

November 11, 2019 at 1:57 am

This is pretty difficult to type.

I am 50 years old.
I had a tramatic childhood, loads of violence and fear, no sexual molestations though.
I have always been ashamed of my body and disfunctional family, so I never had friends over.
A girl or two seemed to like me in high school but I couldn’t do anything because of fear of rejection and if we dated I could never bring her to my house.
I have never dated.
I lived in a remote area with few people other than tourists in the summer. Isolation.
I feel like the biggest loser and endless negative thoughts go through my head.
I am very thoughtful, kind and polite. Animals love me.

My brother lives with me and he takes after my father, mean, and a general dark cloud. I let him move in 17 years ago because I felt sorry for him, thinking it would only be for some shortish period but he is still here, it’ turned out that I had basically moved in a reborn father, but in a younger, crazier version.
There were many, many episodes over nothing witch made me give up on life feeling very depressed.

I was the oldest born of three kids.
My parents had a cottage rental business and I at a young age worked all the time, stepping in to replace my alcoholic father who started sleeping til 4 pm every day.
So I was saddled with responsibility early on with daily temper tantrums performed by my father which caused a depression I’ve never been able to rise above.
I would bounce up at about noon at school then become sad and depressed when I got home.
Then I quit bouncing up, though if you talked to me, I would put on a cheerful attitude for you, you wouldn’t ever guess that I was almost suicidal.

I have never felt good enough, but still I held onto hope.

I always wanted a girlfriend, not just for sex either. I actually wanted to love someone, but it was only a very powerful unrequited love, that has lasted in my heart for 25 years that I got to experience.
I am so screwed up, the pain is unrelenting and blackens my every moment.
I have only felt this way for one woman.
I’ve only taken a poignant pleasure in the beauty of nature. Always solitary walks except when my grandmother would walk too. She loved the colour of sunsets and walking, she was my best friend at times. Such a beautiful person.

I get a brief respite when I’m busy at work, which consumes my life with overtime. My work is solitary even with people around as I usually operate loud equipment with ear protection etc, so I am isolated at work too, in my head with negative thoughts.

I do believe that I would have made some girl very happy but my negative self image and negative home life prevented me from even trying.

I’ve always been a person to help others but I don’t help myself too much

I know that I am broken and cannot be fixed. The fact that I’ve never gotten any attention from any woman since the age of 15 on has completely destroyed me. My thinking was,at about age 18, that if I could get a good job and save for a number of years, that maybe in my 30’s things would be better and I could find someone then.

Imagine a person thinking that way?
Yep, I only have to wait for about 15 years to then maybe see if I would be good enough at that time.

I’m not saying this to get atttention of any type, I started reading on lonerwolf last night, all night, and for some reason wanted to get this off my chest. Obviously I would never tell this to people face to face but this site and timing seemed right.

daves

November 13, 2019 at 3:07 am

Tues nov 12 2019 13.38 est
I feel much better this afternoon after days of reading, in almost all hours aside from work, for about 8 to 12 hours a day.
I’ve been in a black, depressive mood for months after a hernia repair which had me sitting almost always alone for 2 months, feb and march 2019. Previously a never pain in my right leg for a bo
Previously not too bad but not great.
Today at about 13.25 I felt my comprehension of certain feelings change, like a different point of view, I feel much relieved
Like a switch was slow, slowly energizing some device.
This is the best I’ve felt in over two years.
I must also follow up on personal space issues and other things I can’t remember at the moment.
I feel that I made the correct choices in the past now.
It’s sort of like I can breath again.
Regards, Dave.
.

daves

November 13, 2019 at 3:57 am

I’ve been up for three nights and 2 days with only about 2 hours sleep monday nov 11 2019. lello reg. the intense depressive black moods which would bring sounds from my throat like groans, and some anger and great saddness appear to be a thing of the past.
This now seems sudden, this renewed optimistic view, but I’ve been reclusive and depressed for years.
I guess what this is meant by keeping a journal, which I eye rolled when I’ve seen the title. Seems to have helped,
In the middle of the night at work alone, I yelled out injustices, something I’ve never done, with tears wetting my eyes. This went on for only a few minutes.
The black has gone now into the blue.

David Privett

November 30, 2019 at 6:30 am

Hi Dave,
I’m David and I know where you’re coming from. I had about the same life, except my parents owned a restaurant. Now I’ve been married and divorce several times, but rest assured that only makes the situation worst. I loved all my relationships dearly, and about died every time I lost one.
But the good news is if we were ever to meet I wouldn’t want to talk so much about the past. Because with the time of pain and loneliness I found the need to get In touch more than ever with myself and the wonderfulness that is me. And all that was always been inside me wanting to get out. My soul and spirit.
Keep coming to his site and get books on self-improvement.
I promise it gets better…
I wish you all the happiness one can bare, David

daves

December 06, 2019 at 10:21 am

Thank you very much David. It is very tough going right now.
I’ve always loved the beauty of nature as it seemed to be the only thing available to me, though it even brings a different sadness to me.
Best regards, Dave.

January 09, 2020 at 12:54 am

Hey Dave, I’ve just read this article today and went through a few of the comments, including yours now. I just would like to say thank you for sharing openly like you have. I have read every one of your word, sometimes a couple of times to understand your feelings. I heard about your loneliness, the negative thoughts, and the natural despair that comes when thinking about the future (and the past) from this perspective. I deal with a version of that myself at times. I find it tricky to be fully understood, or simply listened to and acknowledged.
I am sure that we all have inside ourselves something beautiful to experience and share with others, love felt and expressed from our own unique lens, made in part by all the loneliness and suffering experienced. It sounds like there were a few days in November where you felt something special in that direction.
Sometimes it helps to think about that. I realize also that sometimes it doesn’t :).
But whichever way it is for you right this moment, what I feel above all is to send you love from a brother in another part of the world. Your message allowed me to do that, and it makes me feel connected. So I just want to sincerely say a big thank you to you for that.
Greg

daves

February 23, 2020 at 6:53 am

Thank you for the response Greg, a connection with another is so great.
I don’t have time at the moment for a longer response but I wanted to say thanks right now as I just happened upon this page at this moment and wanted to acknowledge you asap.
Much love brother, Dave.

daves

February 23, 2020 at 7:04 am

I’ve been reading psychology articles for weeks and have discovered that under myers briggs personality tests that some personalitiy types are prone to feeling of unworthyness etc. Makes me feel a little better somehow.
Regards, Dave.

daves

The myers briggs tests i have done, honestly, btw, so as only to have the truth, indicate that I fit the infj type.
After reading the characteristics of an infj, fit how i think about myself almost perfectly.
That knowledge gives me a little relief.
Regards to all, Dave.


13 Ways to Tell You’ve Got a Super Dad at Home

He stayed calm when you were giving birth and wakes up at 2 a.m. to help with feedings, even when he has to work in the morning. New moms may get most of the credit, but dads have their own share of special powers. Read on for 13 kinds of real-life daddy superheroes.

photo: Eduardo Merille via Flickr

1. The Muscle Man
This dad can balance a baby on his forearm for hours like it’s nothing. Colic? No problem. His magical belly-down cradle hold can soothe your baby’s tummy troubles faster than you can whip out the gripe water. Give your arms a rest and hand over that baby!

2. The Birth Coach
Sure, he wasn’t the one pushing out the baby, but he supported you through every contraction. You probably didn’t notice how hard you were squeezing his hand — and he wasn’t about to tell you. This daddy never let go, even when your newborn was safely in your arms.

3. The Wonder Sleeper
He knows how to get good and comfy while keeping his baby safe. You’ll find this adorable duo snoozing anywhere daddies can get a few minutes to lay down.

4. Phone Caller Extraordinaire!
Someone had to update eager family and friends about when you started labor and once your little bundle arrived. While you were too exhausted to talk to anyone, he was spreading the news and sharing the baby’s stats.

5. The Heavy Lifter
If you had to move or lift anything during your pregnancy, this daddy was always there to help. Now that baby is here, he’s more than happy to carry that load too.

6. The Protector
He was uber-protective during your pregnancy, but becoming a daddy amped up this guy’s papa bear instincts big-time. Before, he had a sweetheart, now, he has a family. He’s got everyone’s back, from now until forever.

photo: Aurimas Mikalauskas via Flickr

7. The Gazer
He might have had eyes only for you before you gave birth, but watch out: This daddy is in love again. He can be found staring into your baby’s eyes endlessly.

8. The Sling Bearer
This man is not afraid to rock the baby sling and makes baby-wearing look cuter than ever. Bonus points for him giving you an hour or two to sleep while he’s toting your tiny tot around town.

9. The Amazing Cord-Cutter
Somebody had to cut the cord, and this brave daddy wasn’t afraid to do the snipping. Your baby’s adorable belly button will be forever grateful.

10. The Brave Bather
He is not afraid to handle a slippery newborn and makes sure he gets them clean from head to adorable toes. Bath time is daddy time so you get a well-deserved break.

11. The Trusty Sidekick
This new dad is happy to give you the spotlight. He’ll stay off to the side in all those new-family photos to let you and the baby shine. But don’t worry: He’ll be there when you need him.

12. The Hand Holder
Your baby’s hands may be tiny, but they’ll look even tinier when you see those little fingers grasping onto daddy’s digits. These hands were made for pictures, so be sure to snap a few.

13. The Healer
He may be your big, strong guy, but he knows all about the power of soft baby kisses. Just watch your little one calm down and coo as he plants a sweet one on those little cheeks. We’re melted!

What makes your baby’s dad a superhero? Tell us in the comments section below.


More than 1 million Michigan residents have now been fully vaccinated against COVID-19

Posted By Steve Neavling on Fri, Mar 12, 2021 at 11:12 AM

click to enlarge
  • Shutterstock
  • The number of Michigan residents fully vaccinated has exceeded 1 million.

More than 1 million Michigan residents — or 12.5% of the state’s population age 16 and older — have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, according to data from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

Health officials are hoping to vaccinate at least 70% of the population to reach herd immunity. To reach that goal, more than 4.5 million people have to be vaccinated.

The state administered 2.84 million doses of vaccines as of Wednesday. The vaccines made by Moderna and Pfizer require two doses, while the vaccines made by Johnson & Johnson require just one.

Overall, 22.4% of Michigan adults and 57.2% of seniors have received at least one dose.

Detroit has the lowest vaccination rate in the state. Only 5.7% of the population 16 and older — or 25,713 people — have been fully vaccinated. About 12.7% of Detroiters have received at least one dose.

In the rest of Wayne County, 12.2% of the population 16 and older have been fully vaccinated, and 19.2% have received at least one dose.

In Oakland County, 13.5% of residents 16 and older have been fully vaccinated, and 23.3% have received at least one dose.

In Macomb County, 11.2% of the population 16 and older has been fully vaccinated, and 20.2% have received at least one dose.

The northern Lower Peninsula has the highest immunization rates, with about 30% receiving at least one dose.

Officials have been trying to boost confidence in vaccines. A troubling survey in December found that less than half of Americans said they would definitely get the vaccine, and about a quarter said they would not. More recent polls show confidence in vaccines is growing.

Without a widespread willingness of the populace to get vaccinated, the consequences could be disastrous: The pandemic won't end, leading to future surges, an overburdened healthcare system, a crippled economy, and needless deaths.

More than 603,000 Michigan residents have tested positive for COVID-19, and 15,729 have died.

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Engage today with Healthy UC. Use #healthyucon social media outlets and tell us how you are focusing on your wellness. Also, follow the Healthy UC partners below for more tips and advice as well as the latest updates.

Every Wednesday will offer various highlights of programming and resources for students, faculty and staff to engage in their well-being. Collaborations will be with UC offices, organizations and community partners. All UC bearcats are welcome to participate!

Winter 2021

Check out what is going on each week of the month!

National Nutrition Month

Every March is annual National Nutrition Month to encourage people to make informed food choices and incorporate healthy eating habits in their day to day. Learn more with the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the 2021 theme, Personalize Your Plate. Plus, follow UC Dining on Instagram for quick tips, features and events @ucofcincydining. Give the Eat the Rainbow Choose Your Own Challenge a try, created by the Be Well UC employee wellness program, also on the Challenges page on Bearcats Landing (UC log in required).

2021 Recreation Movement Challenge

Join the 2021 Recreation Movement, organized by NIRSA, the governing body for UC Campus Recreation. The program encourages participants to exercise and compete against universities across the country to see who is the most active. Participants can take advantage of virtual workouts from more than 100 colleges and universities. Signing up is easy. Create an account using your .edu email address and instantly access live and prerecorded workout, fitness and movement classes. Take a class or go for a walk and then log your active minutes. Every active minute counts! Watch as University of Cincinnati's total minutes stack up against other participating schools.

Staff Professional Development Week

UC staff members: this is a week of virtual workshops and activities just for YOU from March 1-5, 2021. Join us in discovering how to increase your job satisfaction and move your career forward. Whether you need to create more work-life balance, develop stronger relationships at work, or are searching for a mentor, you will find valuable information and opportunities for you to explore at this exciting staff event. Sessions focused on self-care will be offered March 2-5, like Vision Boarding, More than Zero Breathing, Yoga As You Are, and Ergonomic Tips. Staff Professional Development Week is sponsored by the Staff Senate, the Staff Success Center and Human Resources. Details are on the Staff Professional Development Week page on Bearcats Landing (UC log in required).

8-Week Mindfulness and Resiliency Series for Faculty and Staff Development

The 8-week course will be held every Wednesday, March 3 to April 31 from 3-4 p.m. It will cover understanding and managing stress, practical application of mindfulness techniques in the workday, physiological breath techniques for anger and high stress, emotion regulation and improved decision making, mindfulness-based communication skills, increasing focus, including the brain science behind mind wandering, using mindfulness to let go of stress, and practices for transition between work and home to improve work life balance. Hosted by the C Center for Integrative Health and Wellness.

Space is limited, therefore, registrants are asked to commit to attending at least 6 of the 8 weeks in order to participate in the course. Register using Faculty OneStop (UC log in required).

American College Health Foundation (ACHF) Emotional Well-Being Survey

The American College Health Foundation (ACHF) Emotional Well-Being survey is coming to our university! As we adjust to new ways of living, working and learning while facing constant uncertainty, it is pivotal to understand the impact on the well-being and resilience of our community. As faculty, staff and students, you are the foundation of our community and this confidential survey provides the opportunity to share how you’re faring during this difficult time so we can better serve your needs.

This survey focuses on the emotional well-being components of: your sense of meaning in life, your sense of purpose in life, your social support networks, your approach to stress management, how you have been feeling lately, stressors you may be facing, and how inclusive you think our college or university is.

This research study (UC IRB #2021-0078) is for UC students, faculty, and staff who are over the age of 18. The survey will be open from March 9-19. All students, faculty and staff are encouraged to participate! Keep an eye on your UC email—if you meet the study criteria, you’ll receive an email invitation in the coming weeks. Check your "Other" folder for an email directly from the ACHF. The survey should take approximately 12 minutes to complete. Participants will not be compensated for survey completion.

If you have questions about participation, please contact [email protected]

Balance, Burnout, and Boundaries Week

Balance, Burnout, and Boundaries is a week of virtual programming during March 8-11 sponsored by FEC and CET&L with UC community partners focused on energizing your mental, physical and overall health. Experts from UC will provide practical tips for taking care of yourself, as well as attend to the well-being of UC students. Participate in fun, engaging activities, learn about campus resources and connect with a community of Bearcats committed to self-improvement. Register for individual sessions through Faculty OneStop (UC log in required).

Learn It Live: Five Good Minutes with Be Well UC

Tune into this live, virtual session on March 9 from 12:30-1 p.m. online via WebEx. All UC students, faculty and staff welcome! For many of us, from the moment our alarm goes off in the morning, we are “on” – going through the routines, the motions, the everyday activities we are expected to do. But, when we take a moment to pause, breathe, practice mindfulness, even just for 5 minutes, we can find increased peace, calm and focus throughout the day. The book this is based on offers 100 morning practices, however, we will review a few to get you started here. Led by Be Well UC, UC's employee wellness program.

BIAS is a Four-Letter Word with Impact Solutions

On Tuesday, March 9 or Wednesday, March 10 from 1:30-2:30 p.m., join Impact Solutions/All One Health, UC's Employee Assistance Plan (EAP), for this educational webinar on BIAS is a Four-Letter Word. All are welcome to attend. To sign up, register with Go To Webinar or open the EAP link and log in with "bearcats" as the username and password. Once logged in, the webinars are available from the landing page. We all have biases, but so often we don’t even realize them. In this session we will explore the scientific nature of bias, and how to begin to consciously overcome your biases. Faculty and staff can find more information including how to log onto the new Impact Solutions website on the Employee Assistance Plan page Bearcats Landing (UC log in required).

Question, Persuade and Refer (QPR) Trainings

In collaboration with 1n5 and Child Focus, the Division of Student Affairs, Health and Wellness is bringing the opportunity to be trained as a trainer for the evidence-based suicide prevention training, Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR). Save your spot, sign up and learn more on CampusLink. Trainings are offered on March 10, 18, 24, and 30 online. Facilitators will send the link the day before the training to those who register. All students, faculty and staff are welcome to participate.

Stomp Out the Stigma Mental Health Panel

Eta Sigma Gamma (ESG) is a student organization hosting a panel discussion about mental health featuring mental health professionals and students with lived experience. This event will be held on Thursday, March 11 from 12-1:30 p.m. online via Microsoft Teams. Sign up on CampusLink today! The Microsoft Teams link will be sent when you RSVP.

Health at Your Desk with Airrosti and Be Well UC

On March 11 from 12-12:45 p.m., tune into this educational workshop online via Zoom. Learn simple, proven techniques to avoid repetitive strain and postural injuries associated with common workplace environments. During a time where we are likely in front of our computers more and potentially in compromising chairs or work stations, this topic will help you stay injury/pain free! You will learn simple stretches and exercises to help increase flexibility, strength, and range of motion while learning ongoing solutions to relieve tension and stress. Presented by Airrosti, an injury prevention provider and partner of Be Well UC, UC’s employee wellness program.

American College Health Foundation (ACHF) Emotional Well-Being Survey

The American College Health Foundation (ACHF) Emotional Well-Being survey is coming to our university! As we adjust to new ways of living, working and learning while facing constant uncertainty, it is pivotal to understand the impact on the well-being and resilience of our community. As faculty, staff and students, you are the foundation of our community and this confidential survey provides the opportunity to share how you’re faring during this difficult time so we can better serve your needs.

This survey focuses on the emotional well-being components of: your sense of meaning in life, your sense of purpose in life, your social support networks, your approach to stress management, how you have been feeling lately, stressors you may be facing, and how inclusive you think our college or university is.

This research study (UC IRB #2021-0078) is for UC students, faculty, and staff who are over the age of 18. The survey will be open from March 9-19. All students, faculty and staff are encouraged to participate! Keep an eye on your UC email—if you meet the study criteria, you’ll receive an email invitation in the coming weeks. Check your "Other" folder for an email directly from the ACHF. The survey should take approximately 12 minutes to complete. Participants will not be compensated for survey completion.

If you have questions about participation, please contact [email protected]

One Year of Remote Work and Study

About 365 days ago, our university transitioned to remote work and study in light of the pandemic and keeping our community as safe as possible. As students, faculty and staff, know support and resources are available to help you be your best self. Mix in movement and fun with Campus Recreation’s Virtual Resources. Explore Virtual Wellness Resources from the Student Wellness Center on topics, like mental health, sleep and mindfulness, substance abuse, connection, and more. Faculty and staff can explore the Remote Resources page on Bearcats Landing (UC log in required) for information, tips, services and more.

Question, Persuade and Refer (QPR) Trainings

In collaboration with 1n5 and Child Focus, the Division of Student Affairs, Health and Wellness is bringing the opportunity to be trained as a trainer for the evidence-based suicide prevention training, Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR). Save your spot, sign up and learn more on CampusLink. Trainings are offered on March 10, 18, 24, and 30 online. Facilitators will send the link the day before the training to those who register. All students, faculty and staff are welcome to participate.

March Madness

Did you know the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball tournament has persisted for over 80 years? Give the March Madness Challenge, created by the Be Well UC employee wellness program, while cheering on your favorite teams! it’s never too late to invest in yourself in bite size ways while enjoying things that make you happy. Make healthy plays to get your wellness win with this challenge.

Question, Persuade and Refer (QPR) Trainings

In collaboration with 1n5 and Child Focus, the Division of Student Affairs, Health and Wellness is bringing the opportunity to be trained as a trainer for the evidence-based suicide prevention training, Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR). Save your spot, sign up and learn more on CampusLink. Trainings are offered on March 10, 18, 24, and 30 online. Facilitators will send the link the day before the training to those who register. All students, faculty and staff are welcome to participate.

Learn It Live: Eat the Rainbow with Be Well UC

Tune into this live, virtual session on March 24 from 3-3:30 p.m. online via WebEx. All UC students, faculty and staff welcome! The more colorful foods you fit into your day, the more nutrients you’re consuming, which means you’re getting vitamins and minerals naturally. This session will highlight easy tips for making a rainbow on your plate. Led by Be Well UC, your employee wellness program.

Fostering Inclusivity in the Remote World with Impact Solutions

On March 25 from 12-12:30 p.m., join Impact Solutions, UC's Employee Assistance Plan (EAP), for this educational webinar on Fostering Inclusivity in the Remote World. All are welcome to attend. Register with Go To Webinar. This session will define “inclusiveness” as it relates to diversity, equity, and inclusion. We will discuss challenges to foster inclusive climates within a remote workforce, and we will provide actionable tools to begin connecting with and leading your team. Faculty and staff can find more information including how to log onto the new Impact Solutions website on the Employee Assistance Plan page on Bearcats Landing (UC log in required).

American Heart Association (AHA) Heart Mini Digital Experience

The AHA is hosting their annual event virtually this year on March 28! Learn more and get registered.


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