Pet-Friendly Asheville


Campground for Dogs: 4 Paws Kingdom Campground near Rutherfordton is the first and only dog-dedicated campground (campers & RVs), with a fenced-in swimming pond, off-leash play areas, agility park, doggie bathhouse and more. If you don't have an RV or camper, rent one or a cabin. It's like summer camp for dogs! Adult owners only - 18 years or older.

Hiking with Dogs

With the exception of hiking trails in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, dogs are allowed on a leash on almost all trails in the national forests and Blue Ridge Parkway. This includes most all of the hikes and waterfalls we feature! Here are more details:

Dogs on the Blue Ridge Parkway: In addition to being a great place for a dog to hang its head out the window and enjoy the fresh mountain air, dogs are allowed on the more than 100 varied trails throughout the Blue Ridge Parkway. Dogs and other pets must be on a leash or under physical restraint at all times while along the Parkway.

Dogs on Hiking Trails in the National Forests: You can take your dog on any of the hiking trails in the Pisgah National Forest and Nantahala National Forest, including to most waterfalls. Be extra careful of letting your dogs get into the water of a rushing stream or waterfall! Dogs may not be left unattended, and they must be leashed and cleaned up after. Dogs are not allowed in buildings. The camping and tent areas also allow dogs. Read more about camping.

Dogs in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park: Dogs are allowed in campgrounds, picnic areas and along roads, but must be kept on a leash at all times. The leash must not exceed 6 ft. in length. Dogs are only allowed on two short walking paths—the Gatlinburg Trail and the Oconaluftee River Trail. Pets are not allowed on any other park trails. Pet excrement must be immediately collected by the pet handler and disposed of in a trash receptacle. Pets should not be left unattended in vehicles or RVs. Large national parks that have extensive backcountry areas, as a rule, do not allow dogs on trails. Great Smoky Mountains National Park has prohibited dogs in the backcountry since the park was first established in the 1930s. The park prohibits dogs on hiking trails for several reasons:

  • Dogs can carry disease into the park's wildlife populations.
  • Dogs can chase and threaten wildlife, scare birds and other animals away from nesting, feeding and resting sites. The scent left behind by a dog can signal the presence of a predator, disrupting or altering the behavior of park wildlife. Small animals may hide in their burrow the entire day after smelling a dog and may not venture out to feed.
  • Dogs bark and disturb the quiet of the wilderness. Unfamiliar sights, sounds and smells can disturb even the calmest, friendliest and best-trained dog, causing them to behave unpredictably or bark excessively.
  • Pets may become prey for larger predators such as coyotes and bears. In addition, if your dog disturbs and enrages a bear, it may lead the angry bear directly to you. Dogs can also encounter insects that bite and transmit disease and plants that are poisonous or full of painful thorns and burrs.

Pet Rescue and Adoption
Asheville Humane Society is dedicated to the respectful, humane treatment of animals and to providing helpful animal services to the people of our community.

Brother Wolf Animal Rescue: Visit their community adoption center and Second Chance thrift store, located at 31 Glendale Avenue in Asheville. Open seven days a week (Monday-Saturday from 8 AM-8 PM, Sunday 8 AM-6 PM), with many cats and dogs looking for homes.


Watch the video: Antique accommodating Movers in Asheville Greenville Anderson at pet friendly apartments


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